“The temporary photo will wrongly be called frivolous or trivial — after all, only unimportant images could be so easily parted with. But as we have seen, there is meaning in witnessing ephemerality itself, an appreciation of impermanence for its own sake. By carving a space away from the growing necessity to record and collect life into database museums, temporary photography encourages an appreciation of the importance of experiencing the present for its own sake.”
Our snowdrops, impatient, are pushing up through 3 inches of rock-hard ice. #spring #winter #gardens  (at le jardin)

Our snowdrops, impatient, are pushing up through 3 inches of rock-hard ice. #spring #winter #gardens (at le jardin)

From front to back: Riverside ice, Riverside bench, river, more ice.  #spring #vermont #highwater (at north branch nature center)

From front to back: Riverside ice, Riverside bench, river, more ice. #spring #vermont #highwater (at north branch nature center)

Vernal pool #selfie. (at north branch nature center)

Vernal pool #selfie. (at north branch nature center)

The North Branch barely contained. Many snow melt. Such wet. Whoa. #vermont #rivers #spring  (at North Branch of the Winooski River)

The North Branch barely contained. Many snow melt. Such wet. Whoa. #vermont #rivers #spring (at North Branch of the Winooski River)

Sir @lunaticcarl’s fine book, Savage Harvest, gets a front window promo from Rivendell books - & Jimi. #books #savageharvest

Sir @lunaticcarl’s fine book, Savage Harvest, gets a front window promo from Rivendell books - & Jimi. #books #savageharvest

My friend Michael Arnowitt warms the ivories and chops for a lecture on rhythm in music and poetry. I get to read Shakespeare and Joyce.  (at Jewish Community of Greater Stowe)

My friend Michael Arnowitt warms the ivories and chops for a lecture on rhythm in music and poetry. I get to read Shakespeare and Joyce. (at Jewish Community of Greater Stowe)

Spring still has plenty of work to do here.  (at Hubbard Park)

Spring still has plenty of work to do here. (at Hubbard Park)

And the Park falls wonderfully quiet. (at Hubbard Park)

And the Park falls wonderfully quiet. (at Hubbard Park)

newyorker:

Monday marks the twentieth anniversary of the 1994 genocide in Rwanda. Philip Gourevitch looks back over his coverage of the genocide, and considers how his pieces might be read now, at nearly two decades’ remove: http://nyr.kr/1i8T09O
Photograph by Dominic Nahr/Magnum.

newyorker:

Monday marks the twentieth anniversary of the 1994 genocide in Rwanda. Philip Gourevitch looks back over his coverage of the genocide, and considers how his pieces might be read now, at nearly two decades’ remove: http://nyr.kr/1i8T09O

Photograph by Dominic Nahr/Magnum.

“They should listen to the unsaid words that resonate around the edge of the poem.”
theparisreview:

The disappearing face of New York’s storefronts.
Start ‘em young. Gotta like this cover pic of the new issue of Trout. #fishing #trout #cute

Start ‘em young. Gotta like this cover pic of the new issue of Trout. #fishing #trout #cute

theparisreview:

“I had scarcely begun when I realized that what I had here at the very least was the Great American Novel. I sent off the first 150 pages to [agent Bernice Baumgarten] and hung around the post office for the next two weeks. At last an answer came. It read as follows: ‘Dear Peter, James Fenimore Cooper wrote this 150 years ago, only he wrote it better, Yours, Bernice.’ On a later occasion, when as a courtesy I sent her the commission on a short story sold in England, she responded unforgettably: ‘Dear Peter, I’m awfully glad you were able to get rid of this story in Europe, as I don’t think we’d have had much luck with it here. Yours, Bernice.’ Both these communications, quoted in their entirety, are burned into my brain forever—doubtless a salutary experience for a brash young writer. I never heard an encouraging word until the day Bernice retired, when she called me in and barked like a Zen master, ‘I’ve been tough on you because you’re very, very good.’ I wanted to sink down and embrace her knees.”
Peter Matthiessen, on his first novel.

theparisreview:

“I had scarcely begun when I realized that what I had here at the very least was the Great American Novel. I sent off the first 150 pages to [agent Bernice Baumgarten] and hung around the post office for the next two weeks. At last an answer came. It read as follows: ‘Dear Peter, James Fenimore Cooper wrote this 150 years ago, only he wrote it better, Yours, Bernice.’ On a later occasion, when as a courtesy I sent her the commission on a short story sold in England, she responded unforgettably: ‘Dear Peter, I’m awfully glad you were able to get rid of this story in Europe, as I don’t think we’d have had much luck with it here. Yours, Bernice.’ Both these communications, quoted in their entirety, are burned into my brain forever—doubtless a salutary experience for a brash young writer. I never heard an encouraging word until the day Bernice retired, when she called me in and barked like a Zen master, ‘I’ve been tough on you because you’re very, very good.’ I wanted to sink down and embrace her knees.”

Peter Matthiessen, on his first novel.

Causes of death, gay genes, Neanderthals, oh my! Dobbs’s Weekly Reader

Causes of death, gay genes, Neanderthals, oh my! Dobbs’s Weekly Reader

An Afghan walks in a river bed. Photo by the late Anja Niedringhaus

An Afghan walks in a river bed. Photo by the late Anja Niedringhaus

Some of my better finds this week, amid book-writing:

Top Tier

The world has lost a truly splendid photogapher, Afghanistan: Seen Through the Lens of Anja Niedringhaus, shows some of her stunning work. The BBC also has a great selection, as does Niedringhaus’s own site. A determined, brave journalist and an unbelievably sensitive…

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