I wish I had this discipline: to just fish. From “The Legend of Jiang Taigong,” in Fishing Stories, Everyman’s Pocket Classics. A most excellent collection.

Belted Galloway train.

theparisreview:

“With novels, like cakes, you never know.” —Robertson Davies, who was born on this day in 1913.
Photo via

theparisreview:

“With novels, like cakes, you never know.” —Robertson Davies, who was born on this day in 1913.

Photo via

The Borowitz Report: Nation Debates Extremely Complex Issue of Children Firing Military Weapons

newyorker:

“Much like the long-running national debates about jumping off a roof, licking electrical sockets, and gargling with thumbtacks, the vexing question of whether children should fire military weapons does not appear headed for a swift resolution.”

Read more: http://nyr.kr/YYouxn

Photograph by SVEN NACKSTRAND/AFP/Getty

thesciencestudio:

The Weight of Mountains

Here’s a short film by a children’s book illustrator about “the processes by which mountains are created and eventually destroyed, based upon the work of British geographer L. Dudley Stamp.” It’s eye-meltingly gorgeous and starkly scientific. The tone is meditative and incantatory, turning geological terms into epic poetry. If you’ve ever wanted to read John McPhee’s “Annals of the Former World” but only have 11 minutes, watch this.

This week’s picker is John Pavlus — a designer on the inside and a writer/filmmaker on the outside. He makes things that make things make sense for places like NPR, HHMI, Scientific American, Fast Company, Nautilus, and others. 

This is achingly lovely. 

Aftershocks and memories made good.

image

The Aftershocks David Wolman on what it’s like to have children killed in an earthquake — and  to be charged with manslaughter for not predicting it. At Matter.

The trial was consumed by testimony from injured victims and the bereaved. People spoke of relatives who stashed blankets and cookies by the door to grab before exiting in the event of a tremor, but had chosen to stay inside after seeing the TV interview. There was the man whose family had long since believed that tremors are followed by larger subterranean “replies”—and used the experts’ assessment to convince his pregnant wife there was no need to go outside that night. All of them, including their infant son, died when the couple’s home collapsed. There was the university student who was crushed to death, even though his friends had inquired about their dormitory’s seismic stability just a week before. Local officials had told them not to worry.

Scientists Turn Bad Memories Into Good. For mice, anyway. By Greg Miller at Wired. This is one hell of a study.

To try to switch a memory from bad to good, the researchers reactivated the neurons in the hippocampus that encoded the “where” component of a shock memory in a male mouse while he got a more positive stimulus—in this case, getting to spend some quality time with two female mice.…

Prior to the memory altering procedure, when the researchers put the mouse in the enclosure where he’d received the shock and used a pulse of laser light to reactivate the memory in his brain, the mouse avoided the area where he’d gotten zapped. But when they did this after the memory altering procedure, the mouse spent more time in that area and even sniffed around a bit, as if looking for his lady friends. His memory of this place, it seems, had changed from bad to good.

Two of five links from my almost-daily newsletter. Read Two of These And Call Me In The Morning

50 feet up, a steeplejack preps paint on Montpelier’s Unitarian Church. Quite a height. He may be getting religion up there.

instagram:


A Photographic Tour of Sherlock’s London
For a deeper view into London’s most popular landmarks and buildings, check out the #londonsights hashtag on Instagram. To follow “Sherlock” at the 2014 Emmys, browse the #Emmys hashtag.
To fans of the novels and the BBC series, the locations featured in the Sherlock Holmes stories are almost as iconic as the characters themselves.
The most famous of all is 221B Baker Street, the home of Sherlock Holmes and John Watson. Although London’s official Holmes museum now bears that number, the address was completely fictional when Sir Arthur Conan Doyle published the first “Sherlock” novel in 1887—building numbers on Baker Street did not yet extend that high. The flat shown on the British television show is actually located on the much-quieter North Gower Street, near Euston station.
Next door to Sherlock’s imaginary home is Speedy’s Cafe, a frequent filming spot for actors Benedict Cumberbatch (Sherlock) and Martin Freeman (Watson). Speedy’s is a real restaurant and a destination site for super-fans—they even have a Sherlock-themed wrap on the menu. Another notable filming location for the television series is St. Bart’s Hospital in Smithfield, the oldest hospital in Europe and backdrop for Sherlock’s final showdown with arch-nemesis Moriarty.
instagram:


A Photographic Tour of Sherlock’s London
For a deeper view into London’s most popular landmarks and buildings, check out the #londonsights hashtag on Instagram. To follow “Sherlock” at the 2014 Emmys, browse the #Emmys hashtag.
To fans of the novels and the BBC series, the locations featured in the Sherlock Holmes stories are almost as iconic as the characters themselves.
The most famous of all is 221B Baker Street, the home of Sherlock Holmes and John Watson. Although London’s official Holmes museum now bears that number, the address was completely fictional when Sir Arthur Conan Doyle published the first “Sherlock” novel in 1887—building numbers on Baker Street did not yet extend that high. The flat shown on the British television show is actually located on the much-quieter North Gower Street, near Euston station.
Next door to Sherlock’s imaginary home is Speedy’s Cafe, a frequent filming spot for actors Benedict Cumberbatch (Sherlock) and Martin Freeman (Watson). Speedy’s is a real restaurant and a destination site for super-fans—they even have a Sherlock-themed wrap on the menu. Another notable filming location for the television series is St. Bart’s Hospital in Smithfield, the oldest hospital in Europe and backdrop for Sherlock’s final showdown with arch-nemesis Moriarty.
instagram:


A Photographic Tour of Sherlock’s London
For a deeper view into London’s most popular landmarks and buildings, check out the #londonsights hashtag on Instagram. To follow “Sherlock” at the 2014 Emmys, browse the #Emmys hashtag.
To fans of the novels and the BBC series, the locations featured in the Sherlock Holmes stories are almost as iconic as the characters themselves.
The most famous of all is 221B Baker Street, the home of Sherlock Holmes and John Watson. Although London’s official Holmes museum now bears that number, the address was completely fictional when Sir Arthur Conan Doyle published the first “Sherlock” novel in 1887—building numbers on Baker Street did not yet extend that high. The flat shown on the British television show is actually located on the much-quieter North Gower Street, near Euston station.
Next door to Sherlock’s imaginary home is Speedy’s Cafe, a frequent filming spot for actors Benedict Cumberbatch (Sherlock) and Martin Freeman (Watson). Speedy’s is a real restaurant and a destination site for super-fans—they even have a Sherlock-themed wrap on the menu. Another notable filming location for the television series is St. Bart’s Hospital in Smithfield, the oldest hospital in Europe and backdrop for Sherlock’s final showdown with arch-nemesis Moriarty.
instagram:


A Photographic Tour of Sherlock’s London
For a deeper view into London’s most popular landmarks and buildings, check out the #londonsights hashtag on Instagram. To follow “Sherlock” at the 2014 Emmys, browse the #Emmys hashtag.
To fans of the novels and the BBC series, the locations featured in the Sherlock Holmes stories are almost as iconic as the characters themselves.
The most famous of all is 221B Baker Street, the home of Sherlock Holmes and John Watson. Although London’s official Holmes museum now bears that number, the address was completely fictional when Sir Arthur Conan Doyle published the first “Sherlock” novel in 1887—building numbers on Baker Street did not yet extend that high. The flat shown on the British television show is actually located on the much-quieter North Gower Street, near Euston station.
Next door to Sherlock’s imaginary home is Speedy’s Cafe, a frequent filming spot for actors Benedict Cumberbatch (Sherlock) and Martin Freeman (Watson). Speedy’s is a real restaurant and a destination site for super-fans—they even have a Sherlock-themed wrap on the menu. Another notable filming location for the television series is St. Bart’s Hospital in Smithfield, the oldest hospital in Europe and backdrop for Sherlock’s final showdown with arch-nemesis Moriarty.
instagram:


A Photographic Tour of Sherlock’s London
For a deeper view into London’s most popular landmarks and buildings, check out the #londonsights hashtag on Instagram. To follow “Sherlock” at the 2014 Emmys, browse the #Emmys hashtag.
To fans of the novels and the BBC series, the locations featured in the Sherlock Holmes stories are almost as iconic as the characters themselves.
The most famous of all is 221B Baker Street, the home of Sherlock Holmes and John Watson. Although London’s official Holmes museum now bears that number, the address was completely fictional when Sir Arthur Conan Doyle published the first “Sherlock” novel in 1887—building numbers on Baker Street did not yet extend that high. The flat shown on the British television show is actually located on the much-quieter North Gower Street, near Euston station.
Next door to Sherlock’s imaginary home is Speedy’s Cafe, a frequent filming spot for actors Benedict Cumberbatch (Sherlock) and Martin Freeman (Watson). Speedy’s is a real restaurant and a destination site for super-fans—they even have a Sherlock-themed wrap on the menu. Another notable filming location for the television series is St. Bart’s Hospital in Smithfield, the oldest hospital in Europe and backdrop for Sherlock’s final showdown with arch-nemesis Moriarty.
instagram:


A Photographic Tour of Sherlock’s London
For a deeper view into London’s most popular landmarks and buildings, check out the #londonsights hashtag on Instagram. To follow “Sherlock” at the 2014 Emmys, browse the #Emmys hashtag.
To fans of the novels and the BBC series, the locations featured in the Sherlock Holmes stories are almost as iconic as the characters themselves.
The most famous of all is 221B Baker Street, the home of Sherlock Holmes and John Watson. Although London’s official Holmes museum now bears that number, the address was completely fictional when Sir Arthur Conan Doyle published the first “Sherlock” novel in 1887—building numbers on Baker Street did not yet extend that high. The flat shown on the British television show is actually located on the much-quieter North Gower Street, near Euston station.
Next door to Sherlock’s imaginary home is Speedy’s Cafe, a frequent filming spot for actors Benedict Cumberbatch (Sherlock) and Martin Freeman (Watson). Speedy’s is a real restaurant and a destination site for super-fans—they even have a Sherlock-themed wrap on the menu. Another notable filming location for the television series is St. Bart’s Hospital in Smithfield, the oldest hospital in Europe and backdrop for Sherlock’s final showdown with arch-nemesis Moriarty.
instagram:


A Photographic Tour of Sherlock’s London
For a deeper view into London’s most popular landmarks and buildings, check out the #londonsights hashtag on Instagram. To follow “Sherlock” at the 2014 Emmys, browse the #Emmys hashtag.
To fans of the novels and the BBC series, the locations featured in the Sherlock Holmes stories are almost as iconic as the characters themselves.
The most famous of all is 221B Baker Street, the home of Sherlock Holmes and John Watson. Although London’s official Holmes museum now bears that number, the address was completely fictional when Sir Arthur Conan Doyle published the first “Sherlock” novel in 1887—building numbers on Baker Street did not yet extend that high. The flat shown on the British television show is actually located on the much-quieter North Gower Street, near Euston station.
Next door to Sherlock’s imaginary home is Speedy’s Cafe, a frequent filming spot for actors Benedict Cumberbatch (Sherlock) and Martin Freeman (Watson). Speedy’s is a real restaurant and a destination site for super-fans—they even have a Sherlock-themed wrap on the menu. Another notable filming location for the television series is St. Bart’s Hospital in Smithfield, the oldest hospital in Europe and backdrop for Sherlock’s final showdown with arch-nemesis Moriarty.

instagram:

A Photographic Tour of Sherlock’s London

For a deeper view into London’s most popular landmarks and buildings, check out the #londonsights hashtag on Instagram. To follow “Sherlock” at the 2014 Emmys, browse the #Emmys hashtag.

To fans of the novels and the BBC series, the locations featured in the Sherlock Holmes stories are almost as iconic as the characters themselves.

The most famous of all is 221B Baker Street, the home of Sherlock Holmes and John Watson. Although London’s official Holmes museum now bears that number, the address was completely fictional when Sir Arthur Conan Doyle published the first “Sherlock” novel in 1887—building numbers on Baker Street did not yet extend that high. The flat shown on the British television show is actually located on the much-quieter North Gower Street, near Euston station.

Next door to Sherlock’s imaginary home is Speedy’s Cafe, a frequent filming spot for actors Benedict Cumberbatch (Sherlock) and Martin Freeman (Watson). Speedy’s is a real restaurant and a destination site for super-fans—they even have a Sherlock-themed wrap on the menu. Another notable filming location for the television series is St. Bart’s Hospital in Smithfield, the oldest hospital in Europe and backdrop for Sherlock’s final showdown with arch-nemesis Moriarty.

“I am forced into speech because men of science have refused to follow my advice without knowing why. It is altogether against my will that I tell my reasons for opposing this contemplated invasion of the antarctic—with its vast fossil-hunt and its wholesale boring and melting of the ancient ice-cap—and I am the more reluctant because my warning may be in vain.”

H. P. Lovecraft, "At the Mountains of Madness"


Monday First Lines | Every Monday, we offer the opening sentences of a Penguin Classic to start the week.

(via classicpenguin)

“Gathering is peculiar, because you see nothing but what you’re looking for. If you’re picking raspberries, you see only what’s red, and if you’re looking for bones you see only the white. No matter where you go, the only thing you see is bones.”

Tove Jansson in The Summer Book

The Moomin creator would’ve been 100 years old today. Hyvää syntymäpäivää!

(via 57thstreetbooks)

“Oh, whoever has been himself alone can never find another’s loneliness strange.”
— Robert Walser, “Frau Wilke” (via a-quiet-green-agreement)
wordbookstores:

We Recommend: Fear by Gabriel Chevallier (ebook available)
"Join Dartemont in the trenches in this classic of WWI literature. Heroism is quiet, far more nuanced, and grittier than the talking heads would have you think — this book shows all that. It’s also one of the most clear-sighted condemnations of war I’ve read."
—Chad
wordbookstores:

We Recommend: Fear by Gabriel Chevallier (ebook available)
"Join Dartemont in the trenches in this classic of WWI literature. Heroism is quiet, far more nuanced, and grittier than the talking heads would have you think — this book shows all that. It’s also one of the most clear-sighted condemnations of war I’ve read."
—Chad

wordbookstores:

We Recommend: Fear by Gabriel Chevallier (ebook available)

"Join Dartemont in the trenches in this classic of WWI literature. Heroism is quiet, far more nuanced, and grittier than the talking heads would have you think — this book shows all that. It’s also one of the most clear-sighted condemnations of war I’ve read."

Chad

Holy moly that is one fat stack of melancholy. 525 pp of close fine type. #books #depression @NYRBclassics #DarkClassics